Errwhere PWA; bridging the mobile and desktop experience

In the latest stable build of Chrome, came support for desktop progressive web apps (PWAs). Similar to mobile PWAs, desktop PWAs allow users to install apps onto a device’s home screen for quick and easy access. In addition to this, they allow web apps leverage to the numerous capabilities of modern web APIs like authentication, payments and so on, without having to worry about potential security vulnerabilities. After all, a desktop PWA is basically a web browser running in its own app window context.
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When Push Comes to Shove

Push notifications are a simple way in which web applications can interact with users to provide them with timely updates and customized content. When integrated with service workers, push notifications allow web applications a more active and engaging experience that was previously reserved for mobile applications. Technically speaking, this feature is possible thanks to the Push API. The Push API is what allows web applications to receive messages from the server, regardless of whether an application or a user agent is active.
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The (not so) secret life of service workers

Service workers are an important player in the PWA game. Not only are they handy for keeping applications functional while offline, they are also instrumental when it comes to improving overall page load time. Working with a service worker however can be a little tricky. Because they are run in the background of a page (outside of a page’s render cycle) and are registered only once, service workers don’t always work as expected.
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If it's not online does it exist

Offline storage is the linchpin of progressive enhancement. Under a low or unreliable network connection, the app is not dependent on a successful response from the server to be operational. Instead, it reads and writes data from a local in browser database while in offline mode. There are several ways to serve data offline. Picking the right option for your PWA ultimately depends on the type of data you’re intending to store and how big it is.
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At Your Service Worker

Network connectivity is a single point of failure when it comes to user experience on the web. By nature of the web’s reliance on the network, the web fails when the network b0rks. Inadvertently as developers, this means that we’re always at the mercy of network connectivity. When faced with a slow or failed network connection, there is no way for us to help websites gracefully fail. While connectivity is an issue for most mobile web applications because of the reliance on the network, native mobile apps are able to deliver an offline user experience that is on par with an online one.
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